Design and Technology at Ashdale Secondary College provide students with the opportunity to engage in STEM orientated subjects that utilise cutting edge technologies and techniques. Students learn how to work in a collaborative environment and work on solving problems of tomorrow. Students develop a sense of design that then leads to the development of prototypes that are then tested, evaluated and re-designed. These skills that are developed by the students are the skill sets that will make them highly employable in jobs that are yet to be created in the future.

Students are also offered traditional courses that develop skills, knowledge and understanding in using metal, wood, plastics and carbon fibre materials while applying the design process to produce individual products. These skills and knowledge can be utilised for recreational use or can be the stepping stone to a career. The Design and Technology courses develop concepts that prepare students for the changes and advances that the modern world will present.

Teaching and learning practices involve students in programs where:

  • The phases of the Technology Process are used in the acquisition of knowledge and skills about materials, systems and information
  • The Technology Process includes: investigating, designing, producing and evaluating

Technology provides a stimulus whereby students:

  • Generate and act on new ideas
  • Learn skills to operate materials, systems, information, equipment, machines and tools, and to reduce wastage
  • Gain an understanding of past and present technologies

This will enable students to:

  • Develop problem-solving skills and generate technological solutions to questions
  • Develop knowledge and skills using a variety of equipment, resources and materials
  • Discover how to use a range of appropriate equipment, machines and tools safely and efficiently for each situation

Students:

  • Investigate and design using appropriate planning processes and design briefs
  • Create and develop ideas, apply information, and seek and test innovative alternatives
  • Produce, including the selection and safe use of appropriate tools, equipment, materials and/or processes to meet the requirements of design briefs
  • Analyse and evaluate both processes and products including, where relevant, any broader environmental, social, cultural and economic factors

Years 7-10 Design & Technology

Year 9

Mechatronics

This course introduces students to robotics and automation and is designed to promote enterprise, initiative and skills in mechanical, electrical and coding systems. Students will have the opportunity to solve problems, design solutions and work in a fun practical environment. Robotics and automation is the practical application of artificial intelligence, which is rapidly growing in importance for industrial, domestic, entertainment and military applications. Students will be encouraged to design and engineer practical solutions to solve realistic and challenging problems. Students have the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in electronics, mechanics, simple engineering, electrical circuits, coding and applied mathematics to solve student- centred open-ended tasks.

Wood

In this course, the students get to build small projects with a specific focus on solutions.  The students will build confidence and independence through skill-building exercises to allow the students to select, use tools and machinery correctly and safely to develop working solutions and projects.  The students begin to understand where the materials are sourced and therefore learn cost and effect on society and the environment.

Students’ apply creativity, innovation and thinking skills combined with technology to generate original ideas to produce a realistic solution with the aide of 2D and 3D drafting software.  The students can resolve problems and consider the advantages and disadvantages before committing to building a physical prototype/project. The students will establish safety procedures in the workshop to minimise their risk in the workshop and learn to correctly manage the project. They learn to transfer theoretical knowledge to practical activities.

Metalwork

This is a practical course to promote student initiative and enterprise in designing, fabricating and manufacturing projects using a variety of metalwork hand tools, power tools and machinery. The students are exposed to fundamental processes of design, working with materials, skills and techniques commonly used in the metal trades industry to create solutions. Students will be developing a variety of practical skills and techniques required for: oxy acetylene fusion and braze welding, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMAW) and machine operations.

Jewellery

This course offers students a range of set development tasks where they make basic jewellery out of copper and brass to develop their hand skills. After each project is made, they then produce the article of jewellery out of sterling silver. Students learn how to size, bend, shape, solder and finish their article of jewellery. After students have developed skill and technique, they then use the Technology Process to research, design, make and evaluate an article of jewellery they wish to make for themselves. Other skills that can be incorporated into student designs are basic casting and stone setting with a bezel.

Year 10

Mechatronics

Mechatronics is a practical course focusing on real-life engineering solutions. It is designed to prepare students for a future in the technological world by providing the foundation for life-long learning about systems engineering. Mechatronics provides a focus on practical design through creative and industry relevant opportunities that enable students to investigate, research and construct systems-based engineering products. This subject provides students with opportunities to apply engineering, programming and electronic processes; understand underpinning scientific and mathematical principles and develop engineering, electronic and robotic technology skills.

Mechatronics caters for the learning needs of all students, from those seeking a career in the many varied engineering disciplines to others pursuing an avid interest in the subject. Students will be choosing a course that will allow them to achieve post-school destinations into a range of careers including engineering, automation, robotics, science, aviation, mechanics, fabrication and electrical trades, drafting, architecture and other practical and technology related work and engineering.

Wood

The Year 10 Woodwork course is an introduction unit for students who have limited experience in the manufacturing of wooden furniture products. Students learn and apply the fundamentals of design to develop and manufacture furniture and small projects for themselves. They learn to produce pictorial drawings and follow the basics of the design process to assist them in their manufacturing. Students will gain an understanding of different woods and materials and will be introduced to relevant technology skills which include the use of; hand tools, power tools and woodworking machines. Basic IT programs, like Sketch-up and CAD programs, will be used to give students a head start with programs used in the production and design industry with real-world applications.

Jewellery

This course refines the set of skills and knowledge developed in the previous course and sets the student on a path of higher skill development in jewellery making and silversmithing. Students will learn basic techniques in cuttlefish and lost wax casting and the ability to incorporate these casting with fabricated components. Students will also develop skills in setting semi-precious stones in rings and pendants using pure silver bezel and silver plate. After students have developed skill and technique, they then use the Technology Process to research, design, make and evaluate an article of jewellery they wish to make for themselves.

Year 9 & 10 Model Making and 3d Prototype Development

To create a working model/prototype with a modern and/or traditional technique is one of the single most important parts in the development of a project or idea. This course will allow students to explore materials (metal, plastics, wood), using specialised techniques to build scale models.  These models and designs will form their major projects for each term and semester reporting. The course will be a challenge based learning environment enabling students to solve problems in a safe and challenging environment. Students will use technology to develop their ideas using 3D drawing software.  The software is directly connected to industry relevant software. Students understand what designers, engineers, and inventors experience and learn through modifying, building, thinking and developing problem-solving skills.

Currently, the greatest inventor in the modern age is Elon Musk who is changing and disrupting current ideas and beliefs in transport and energy.  One famous quote is ‘If something’s important enough, you should try. Even if you – the probable outcome is failure.’ Elon Musk. Elon Musk every day gets to play with the latest technology surrounded by great people who think and get excited about engineering and problem-solving. In this course, we will focus on developing real-world prototypes with a focus modifying and testing student ideas.

Senior School Design & Technology

Materials Design and Technology General courses aim to prepare all students for a future in a technological and material world by providing the foundation for lifelong learning about how products are designed and how materials are developed and used.

Year 11

Materials Design and Technology General (Metalwork)

This is a practical course to promote students’ initiative and enterprise in designing, fabricating and manufacturing projects using a variety of metalwork hand tools, power tools, lathes, milling machines, and other industrial machinery. The students are exposed to fundamental processes of design, working with materials, skills and techniques commonly used in the metal trades industry to create solutions. Students will be developing a variety of practical skills and techniques required for oxy-acetylene welding and cutting, Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMAW), plasma cutting equipment, fabrication and machine operations used in the industry.

Materials Design and Technology General (Woodwork)

The Materials Design and Technology General course is a practical course for the most part. The course allows students the chance to explore and work using wood, with the design and manufacture of products as the major focus. There is also the flexibility to incorporate additional materials from outside the designated context. This will enhance and complement the knowledge and skills developed within the course as many modern-day products are manufactured using a range of different material types. Students use experimentation and research as well as developing their creativity and increasing their understanding of the society in which they live. Working with materials, students develop a range of manipulation, processing, manufacturing and organisational skills. When designing with materials, they develop cognitive skills; such as solving problems, generating ideas, creative design strategies and communicating what they do. This makes them more technologically literate and as consumers, enables them to make more informed decisions about the use and misuse of technology.

Design General (Technical Graphics)

Design involves the strategic development, planning and production of visual concepts and solutions developed to relative industry quality and standard.  The initial focus of the first year is to learn the principles of design an experiment with basic elements of design.  The skills increase throughout the year allowing the student to focus on breaking an idea down, effectively communicate an idea and find some solutions for a targeted audience for specific purposes with specific intentions. The first year in the year 11 syllabuses is divided into two units, each of one semester duration.

Unit 1 – Design Fundamentals the focus of this unit is to introduce the design process and practice. Students learn that design can be used to provide solutions to design problems and communicate that need. They are introduced to basic design skills and a range of techniques related to technical design drafting and freehand drawing skills to demonstrate control over the elements and principles of design.

Unit 2 – Personal Design allows students to visually communicate aspects of their personality, values and beliefs. Students explore design elements and principles and the design process in a project communicating something of themselves. Students increase familiarity with basic production skills and processes, materials and technologies.

Product design is where Students learn that the commercial world is comprised of companies, requiring consumer products, services and brands for an audience. They are introduced to the concept of intellectual property. Using the design process, they create products/services, visuals and/or layouts with an awareness of codes and conventions. They use relevant and appropriate production skills and processes, materials and technologies relevant to the design. Technical Graphics focuses on promotional products, for example, lunch boxes, drink bottles; ergonomic design, for example, hair dryers, shavers; kitchen appliances, for example, toasters, could be re-designed to appeal to a broader demographic; motor vehicle styling, component parts, architecture, mechanical, geometric figures.

The students develop freehand drawing combined 3D computer-aided drawing skills, the main software is Fusion 360. Fusion 360 is a software product of Autodesk which is directly connected to Inventor and Auto Cad.  The students can use their newly developed skills to apply for drafting and related sales jobs which require some drawing and designing for clients need. This course also emphasises the scope of design in professional and trade based industries allowing students to maximise vocational and/or university pathways.

Engineering Studies General

The Engineering Studies General course is essentially a practical course focusing on real-life challenges. The focus will be on entering the EV Challenge competition. The EV Challenge (electric vehicle) is an annual engineering competition in which students design and build a single seat electric vehicle to complete as many laps as possible in one hour. The EV challenge has been developed learning outcomes embedded around engineering.  The focus of the EV Challenge is for students to engage in challenging activities with real-world results; to build a safe reliable prototype of a driveable car.  The car can achieve speeds of 60km an hour.

The program has been run over the past 3 years at Ashdale SC outside school hours with amazing results.  Students learn to make a commitment, face their fears, drive and take risks in a controlled safe environment. The students will learn to breakdown the car into the major parts and focus on an area of personal interest.  They will develop a plan for a working solution through trial and error. Discovery of problem-solving, teamwork, perform under pressure and meet deadlines in a timely manner.

As part of the course the students will get to practice driving in a controlled environment, test working vehicles, evaluate performance, consider workable solutions and improvements.  This process will allow the students to develop real-world practical skills, improve communication and build confidence to tackle challenging problems through teamwork. Students develop their engineering technology skills in planning and implementing a process to manipulate tools and machines to produce a prototype of their designed solution. The Engineering Studies General course is essentially a practical course focusing on real‐life contexts. It aims to prepare students for a future in an increasingly technological world, by providing the foundation for life‐long learning about engineering. It is particularly suited to those students who are interested in engineering and technical industries as future careers.

Certificate II in Engineering Pathways (VET)

Engineering Pathways is intended for students interested in exposure to an engineering or related working environment with a view to entering into employment in that area. This qualification will equip graduates with knowledge and skills which will enhance their prospects of employment in an engineering or related working environment. Students undertaking this subject should have a keen interest in the engineering field and possess an appreciation of Occupational Health and Safety standards required in a workshop environment.

Students will develop trade- like skills but will not attempt to develop trade- level skills. As an example, the outcome level of welding skills from this qualification is not about learning trade-level welding theory and practice; it is about being introduced to welding, how it can be used to join metal and having the opportunity to weld some metal together. Similarly, with machining, the outcome will be something produced on a lathe etc, not the theory and practice of machining. The focus will be on using engineering tools and equipment to produce or modify objects. This will be done in a safe manner for each learner and those around them.

Year 12

Materials Design and Technology General (Metalwork)

The Materials Design and Technology General metal course is a practical course. The course allows teachers the choice to explore and use materials learning in metal, with the design and manufacture of products as the major focus. There is also the flexibility to incorporate additional materials from outside the designated contexts. This will enhance and complement the knowledge and skills developed within the course as many modern-day products are manufactured using a range of different material types. Students examine social and cultural values and the short-term and long-term impacts of the use and misuse of materials and associated technologies. Through this inquiry, experimentation and research, students develop their creativity and understanding of the society in which they live.

Materials Design and Technology General (Woodwork)

The Materials Design and Technology General course is a practical course for the most part. The course allows students the chance to explore and work using wood, with the design and manufacture of products as the major focus. There is also the flexibility to incorporate additional materials from outside the designated context. This will enhance and complement the knowledge and skills developed within the course as many modern-day products are manufactured using a range of different material types. Students use experimentation and research as well as developing their creativity and increasing their understanding of the society in which they live. Working with materials, students develop a range of manipulation, processing, manufacturing and organisational skills. When designing with materials, they develop cognitive skills; such as solving problems, generating ideas, creative design strategies and communicating what they do. This makes them more technologically literate and as consumers, enables them to make more informed decisions about the use and misuse of technology.

Design General (Technical Graphics)

Design involves the strategic development, planning and production of visual concepts and solutions developed to industry quality and standard.  The focus is for the students to break an idea down and effectively communicate their ideas and solutions to specific audiences for specific purposes and with specific intentions. Product design is where Students learn that the commercial world is comprised of companies, requiring consumer products, services and brands for an audience. They are introduced to the concept of intellectual property. Using the design process, they create products/services, visuals and/or layouts with an awareness of codes and conventions. They use relevant and appropriate production skills and processes, materials and technologies relevant to the design.

The context is Technical Graphics which focuses on promotional products, for example, lunch boxes, drink bottles; ergonomic design, for example, hair dryers, shavers; kitchen appliances, for example, toasters, could be re-designed to appeal to a broader demographic; motor vehicle styling, component parts, architecture, mechanical, geometric figures. The students will use and develop freehand drawing and 3D computer-aided drawing skills, the main software is Fusion 360.  Fusion 360 is a software product of Autodesk which is directly connected to Inventor and Auto Cad.  The students can use their newly developed skills to apply for drafting and related sales jobs which require some drawing and designing for clients need. This course also emphasises the scope of design in professional and trade based industries allowing students to maximise vocational and/or university pathways.